Articles

These are a few examples of long form articles I have written during my time as a journalism student at the University of Oregon. They demonstrate my interview, research, and writing skills.

 

Genetically Modified Organisms

By Rachel Davidson

This was one of my favorite articles I have ever researched. I had some previous knowledge and interest in GMOs, but afterwards was amazed at the wealth of research I found. Today GMOs are still something I am very passionate about

This was one of my favorite articles I have ever researched. I had some previous knowledge and interest in GMOs, but afterwards was amazed at the wealth of research I found. Today GMOs are still something I am very passionate about

There is an enormous push for Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) labeling in the United States. Citizens, activists, and grocery stores are concerned that there are potential health risks, that GMOs are already infiltrating our food supply unknowingly, and that a majority of the population is unaware of what a GM crop is, yet alone how it is affecting society.

However the GMO debacle and agitated labeling push is no new trend. Multiple research studies on health affects, political debates with major funding from both sides, and discussions over the economics of GM foods are just some of the multitude of issues discussed around GM foods. This hot topic and popular concern in today’s modern world is specifically emerging from both the Agra-business community and consumers who have a highly negative association (53%), reported a recent Rutgers study.

Although the GMO topic is usually associated with negative connotations and uncertainty, it doesn’t change the fact that, more and more GM crops are being planted every year, and the US continues to be a leader in the Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) movement.  A Pew Study reports that the GM crops in America account for nearly two-thirds of the total GM crops worldwide.

To Continue reading the article please click the button to the right:

 


Is Smokey the Bear, Smoked Out? Forest Fires Increase in Oregon

By Rachel Davidson

One of the greatest skills I have learned at the UO Journalism school is to be curious, creative, and inventive. I was curious about a topic that was outside my comfort zone-and am very pleased with the final result. This particular piece was done for my Reporting 2 class and would potentially appear in a newspaper.

One of the greatest skills I have learned at the UO Journalism school is to be curious, creative, and inventive. I was curious about a topic that was outside my comfort zone-and am very pleased with the final result. This particular piece was done for my Reporting 2 class and would potentially appear in a newspaper.

EUGENE, Ore.—Forest fires are increasing due to both weather conditions and human intervention, making this season one of the deadliest yet in Oregon.  According to the Oregon Department of Forestry’s annual fire report, a total of 1,134 fires were reported this year burning over 100,000 acres.

The fire season began with a mid winter and continued with a dry spring. High temperatures, a low snowfall, and hints of drought were ideal weather conditions for  the most intense fire season in half a century. Oregon Forestry Fire Prevention Specialist, Brian Ballou, knew it was going to be an unusual fire season when the Oregon Department of Forestry reported 25 lightning storm fires in May, a rare occurrence.  As a rule, a typical fire season has rain lasting from January through May, with lightning storms not occurring until June. “Fires starting in May are rare,” Ballou says. “After that incident, I knew it was going to be an unusual fire season.”

To Continue reading the article please click the button to the right:

 

Kale Galettes, Mu-Shu Pork Pancakes & Steel-Cut Oats
A Glimpse into the life of three Oregon based food writers

 By Rachel Davidson

How do you describe the crunchy, crisp, cursive swirl-like leafy greenness of kale? The green vegetable so bitter that if taken a bite raw, tastes as though your mouth has eaten a cross between soft cotton and bitter lemon. How do you convince readers to sauté it with butter and garlic and put aside perceived misconceptions of this calcium rich-veggie?  Or how do you characterize the texture of perfectly cooked prawns? Forget about using words such as: delicious, yummy, foodie, mouth-watering, or farm fresh in anything you write; they are overused and have lost any meaning..

Out of the many types of writing, reporting vs. feature, on-staff vs. freelance, many stop at just that, a writer. Specialization within the writing industry can be seen as a restriction; to others it is a chance to explore a specific passion. For some, that passion is the world of cooking, tasting, and eating and their area of specialization is the deliciously addictive world of food writing. In a state full of agricultural promise and a variety of seasonal fruits available at all times, Oregon-based food writers have a plethora of topics to dive in to. But how does one get started in food writing? Three Oregon-based women food writers discuss their personal journey from past to present. Tough and competitive, why specialize in food at all?

To Continue reading the article please click the button to the right: